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About Karah Pino, MAcOM

Karah Pino is the External Communications Manager for the B.R.I.D.G.E.S. Project. She completed a BA in Interdisciplinary Visual Art from the University of Washington and a clinical master’s degree in East Asian Medicine practices and principles from the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine. Karah engages in a collaborative model to develop graphics, content and curriculum for workshops, webinars, websites and social media. Karah is also a trained facilitator in collaborative solutions processes, which aim to create win-win strategies and buy-in for community groups and professional teams.

Name: Harold Moss, Age: 67, Height: 5 feet 11 inches, Single, no children, part-time tennis instructor, cancer survivor. If you are patient and disciplined, you cna be stronger than you were 10 years ago.

My Physical Activity Routine/Program

Most days, I start with stretching. That’s mostly to keep me in touch with what I can or can’t do that day. Then typically I’ll go down to the gym in our building and work my biceps, triceps, quads, hamstrings and stomach muscles. I may swim for 10 or 15 minutes for the aerobic part. In my case, since I want to get my heart pumping, I swim vigorously. Now that I’ve started teaching tennis again, I may skip the gym on days I teach. And several evenings a week I try to play tennis with my wife.

How I Do It: My Routine
Sun
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thurs
Fri
Sat
Quick Check
tennis
60 min
jogging
tennis
90 min
jogging
swim
15 min
jogging
tennis
45 min
jogging
swim
15 min
jogging
tennis
60 min
jogging
check Exceeds
aerobic guidelines
gym
with
weights
weight training
gym
with
weights
weight training
gym
with
weights
weight training
check Exceeds
muscle strenthening
guidelines

Why I Started

After my physical catastrophes – high blood pressure, surgery for prostate cancer, hip replacement – my mental state was fragile. I’d never worried about my body because I’m an athlete. But when you can’t move, it’s extremely depressing! Once I decided to go through with the hip replacement, I started developing my leg muscles – quads and hamstrings – so my recovery from the surgery would be better. That ended up being a good thing, because the physical therapist said I recovered faster than most.

Benefits

Now, not only can I walk but I can run – like a little kid again!

Biggest Motivation

I want to live a little longer. I want to feel good. I love life and I want to be engaged in life. Both my brothers had strokes and one is gone – and they’re younger than I am.

Biggest Challenge

Now that I’m older, my weight zooms up very quickly. I’ve just lost 10 pounds, but for about a year it looked like it was never going to change.

Greatest Achievement/Biggest Thrill

I’ve been able to play tennis against some of the same people I used to play 5 to 10 years ago. It took a couple weeks, but now I’m actually winning games.

Read David's Story on the CDC Website:

DavidDavid, Age 65
“I have been able to control my diabetes with diet and exercise rather than insulin.”

  May 31, 2018, 2:48 PM Business Insider

  • Exercise is the closest thing to a miracle drug that we have, according to a growing body of research.

  • When it comes to keeping the brain young and staving off the effects of aging, two types of workouts appear to be the best: cardio and strength training.

  • A new review of nearly 100 well-designed studies found positive cognitive effects were linked with activities like walking, cycling, and yoga when people did them for an hour three times a week.

Authors

Abstract

There is evidence from high quality studies to strongly support the positive association between increased levels of physical activity, exercise participation and improved health in older adults.

Worldwide, around 3.2 million deaths per year are being attributed to inactivity. In industrialised countries where people are living longer lives, the levels of chronic health conditions are increasing and the levels of physical activity are declining. Key factors in improving health are exercising at a moderate-to-vigorous level for at least 5 days per week and including both aerobic and strengthening exercises.

Few older adults achieve the level of physical activity or exercise that accompanies health improvements. A challenge for health professionals is to increase physical activity and exercise participation in older adults.

Some success in this has been reported when physicians have given specific, detailed and localised information to their patients, but more high quality research is needed to continue to address this issue of non-participation in physical activity and exercise of a high enough level to ensure health benefits.

...continue reading "Physical activity is medicine for older adults"

Physical Activity is Essential to Healthy Aging

As an older adult, regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health. It can prevent many of the health problems that seem to come with age. It also helps your muscles grow stronger so you can keep doing your day-to-day activities without becoming dependent on others.

Not doing any physical activity can be bad for you, no matter your age or health condition. Keep in mind, some physical activity is better than none at all. Your health benefits will also increase with the more physical activity that you do.

If you're 65 years of age or older, are generally fit, and have no limiting health conditions you can follow the guidelines listed below.

For Important Health Benefits Older adults need at least:

...continue reading "How much physical activity do older adults need? CDC Guidelines"

Regular exercise is important to keep you moving and independent. Exercise helps lessen pain, increase movement, reduce fatigue and helps you feel better.

Range of Motion Exercises, Strengthening Exercises, Endurance Exercises

...continue reading "Arthritis and Physical Activity from Living Well Utah"

Researchers say lack of health insurance coverage is a big reason older adults in the United States lag behind seniors in other developed nations.

senior health

The United States may not be the best place to be a senior citizen.A recent study that examined the health of people aged 65 years and older in the United States and 10 other high-income countries found that American seniors were sicker and more likely to face barriers in accessing healthcare than their counterparts in other countries.

...continue reading "Seniors in the United States Less Healthy Than in Other Countries from Healthline"

Brain imaging is illuminating the neural patterns behind pain’s infinite variety.

...
For scientists, pain has long presented an intractable problem: it is a physiological process, just like breathing or digestion, and yet it is inherently, stubbornly subjective—only you feel your pain. It is also a notoriously hard experience to convey accurately to others.
Virginia Woolf bemoaned the fact that “the merest schoolgirl, when she falls in love, has Shakespeare or Keats to speak her mind for her; but let a sufferer try to describe a pain in his head to a doctor and language at once runs dry.” Elaine Scarry, in the 1985 book “The Body in Pain,” wrote, “Physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it.”

...continue reading "The Neuroscience of Pain: The New Yorker"

What to expect, what to look forward to and what to do now for a longer, happier life

Illustration of two mature adults jogging

PETER ARKLE

In your 60s you are likely to have a long, healthy life ahead of you. Men turning 65 this year can expect to live, on average, to age 84.3; women, until age 86.6.

The good news in your 60s: Making healthy changes will have a greater impact today than at any other time in your life.

...continue reading "AARP: Your Body’s General Health at 60+"