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Upper Body Exercises and Lower Body Exercises

Try to do strength exercises for all of your major muscle groups on 2 or more days per week for 30-minute sessions each, but don’t exercise the same muscle group on any 2 days in a row.

woman doing seated row with band

Seated Row with Resistance Band

woman doing chair dips

Chair Dip

arm curl with resistance bands

Arm Curl with Resistance Band

man doing wall push ups

Wall Push-Up

arm curl

Arm Curl

woman doing side arm raise

Side Arm Raise

man doing front arm raise

Front Arm Raise

woman doing overhead arm raise

Overhead Arm Raise

wrist curl

Wrist Curl

Hand holding a tennis ball

Hand Grip

woman doing stages of elbow extension

Elbow Extension

woman doing toe stand exercise

Toe Stand

man doing stages of chair stand exercise

Chair Stand

woman doing leg straightening exercise

Leg Straightening

man doing knee curl

Knee Curl

woman doing side leg raise

Side Leg Raise

man doing back leg raise

Back Leg Raise

Icon: Safety

SAFETY

Don’t hold your breath during strength exercises. Holding your breath while straining can cause changes in blood pressure. Breathe in slowly through your nose and breathe out slowly through your mouth.

Progressing

Gradually increase the amount of weight you use to build strength. Start out with a weight you can lift only 8 times. Use that weight until you can lift it easily 10 to 15 times. When you can do 2 sets of 10 to 15 repetitions easily, add more weight so that, again, you can lift it only 8 times. Repeat until you reach your goal.

There are many ways you can strengthen your muscles, whether it's at home or the gym. The activities you choose should work all the major muscle groups of your body (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms). You may want to try:

  • Lifting weights
  • Working with resistance bands
  • Doing exercises that use your body weight for resistance (push ups, sit ups)
  • Heavy gardening (digging, shoveling)
  • Yoga

...continue reading "Muscle-strengthening activities – what counts? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention"

Physical Activity is Essential to Healthy Aging

As an older adult, regular physical activity is one of the most important things you can do for your health. It can prevent many of the health problems that seem to come with age. It also helps your muscles grow stronger so you can keep doing your day-to-day activities without becoming dependent on others.

Not doing any physical activity can be bad for you, no matter your age or health condition. Keep in mind, some physical activity is better than none at all. Your health benefits will also increase with the more physical activity that you do.

If you're 65 years of age or older, are generally fit, and have no limiting health conditions you can follow the guidelines listed below.

For Important Health Benefits Older adults need at least:

...continue reading "How much physical activity do older adults need? CDC Guidelines"