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Deaths from unintentional injuries are the seventh leading cause of death among older adults (1), and falls account for the largest percentage of those deaths.

As the population of persons aged 65+ years in the United States, increases, the rising number of deaths from falls in this age group can be addressed by screening for fall risk and intervening to address modifiable risk factors such as polypharmacy or gait, strength, and balance issues.

Approximately one in four U.S. residents aged 65+ years (older adults) report falling each year, and fall-related emergency department visits are estimated at approximately 3 million per year.

...continue reading "Deaths from Falls Among Persons Aged 65+ Years — Statistics from the CDC"

Upper Body Exercises and Lower Body Exercises

Try to do strength exercises for all of your major muscle groups on 2 or more days per week for 30-minute sessions each, but don’t exercise the same muscle group on any 2 days in a row.

woman doing seated row with band

Seated Row with Resistance Band

woman doing chair dips

Chair Dip

arm curl with resistance bands

Arm Curl with Resistance Band

man doing wall push ups

Wall Push-Up

arm curl

Arm Curl

woman doing side arm raise

Side Arm Raise

man doing front arm raise

Front Arm Raise

woman doing overhead arm raise

Overhead Arm Raise

wrist curl

Wrist Curl

Hand holding a tennis ball

Hand Grip

woman doing stages of elbow extension

Elbow Extension

woman doing toe stand exercise

Toe Stand

man doing stages of chair stand exercise

Chair Stand

woman doing leg straightening exercise

Leg Straightening

man doing knee curl

Knee Curl

woman doing side leg raise

Side Leg Raise

man doing back leg raise

Back Leg Raise

Icon: Safety

SAFETY

Don’t hold your breath during strength exercises. Holding your breath while straining can cause changes in blood pressure. Breathe in slowly through your nose and breathe out slowly through your mouth.

Progressing

Gradually increase the amount of weight you use to build strength. Start out with a weight you can lift only 8 times. Use that weight until you can lift it easily 10 to 15 times. When you can do 2 sets of 10 to 15 repetitions easily, add more weight so that, again, you can lift it only 8 times. Repeat until you reach your goal.

Exercise is safe for almost everyone. In fact, studies show that people with osteoarthritis benefit from regular exercise and physical activity.

Senior man on a bicycle and wearing a helmet

For people with osteoarthritis, regular exercise can help:

  • Maintain healthy and strong muscles
  • Preserve joint mobility
  • Maintain range of motion
  • Improve sleep
  • Reduce pain
  • Keep a positive attitude
  • Maintain a healthy body weight

Three types of exercise are best if you have osteoarthritis:

...continue reading "Go4Life: Exercising with Osteoarthritis from the National Institute on Aging"

You know you should be more active, but there are so many things that seem to get in the way. It’s time for some positive thinking. No more excuses!

Overcoming Barriers to Physical Activity
Adapted from the National Institute on Aging

Follow these tips to help you overcome those barriers and improve your health:

...continue reading "Go4Life: Overcoming Barriers to Exercise: No More Excuses from the National Institute on Aging"

Authors

Abstract

There is evidence from high quality studies to strongly support the positive association between increased levels of physical activity, exercise participation and improved health in older adults.

Worldwide, around 3.2 million deaths per year are being attributed to inactivity. In industrialised countries where people are living longer lives, the levels of chronic health conditions are increasing and the levels of physical activity are declining. Key factors in improving health are exercising at a moderate-to-vigorous level for at least 5 days per week and including both aerobic and strengthening exercises.

Few older adults achieve the level of physical activity or exercise that accompanies health improvements. A challenge for health professionals is to increase physical activity and exercise participation in older adults.

Some success in this has been reported when physicians have given specific, detailed and localised information to their patients, but more high quality research is needed to continue to address this issue of non-participation in physical activity and exercise of a high enough level to ensure health benefits.

...continue reading "Physical activity is medicine for older adults"

Living Well with Chronic Pain - Participants learn self-management techniques and skills needed in the day-to-day management of their chronic pain condition.

Program Benefits

The Chronic Pain Self-Management Program (CPSMP) is a 6-session evidence-based workshop designed for those dealing with chronic pain. Participants learn self-management techniques and skills needed in the day to day management of their chronic pain condition. This program has also been proven effective with family and caregivers. This program also aims to help participants better communicate with their health care providers and make healthy day-to-day decisions.

REGISTER FOR THIS LIVING WELL PROGRAM

...continue reading "“Living Well with Chronic Pain” – A Living Well Utah Program"

Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program is a community-based recreational program specifically designed to teach adults with arthritis how to exercise safely.

Program Benefits

Trained instructors cover a variety of range-of-motion exercises, endurance-building activities, relaxation techniques, and health education topics. All of the exercises can be modified to meet participant needs and abilities. Participants completing the program report experiencing:

  • Improved functional ability
  • Decreased depression
  • Decreased pain
  • Increased confidence in one's ability to exercise

REGISTER FOR THIS LIVING WELL PROGRAM

...continue reading "“Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program” – A Living Well Utah Program"